Pages

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Because I'm Special

Following my post on Nina's comment about her "sticky hands", we spoke with her teacher and they agreed to talk about each child's uniqueness in class.  For me, the advantage of a non-traditional school set-up is that matters like these can easily be addressed and incorporated into their lessons.

After that incident, she only asked me once: "Mommy, why are my hands sticky?" But she also followed it up with "Because I was born special?"

Sticky hands or not, we all agree that our children are special - with or without the presence of any disability.  But for parents who have to deal with more challenges than usual, it is but natural that they believe, with all their heart that their kiddos are doubly special than the rest.



Psalm 139:13-16For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother's womb. I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well. My frame was not hidden from you, when I was being made in secret, intricately woven in the depths of the earth. Your eyes saw my unformed substance; in your book were written, every one of them, the days that were formed for me, when as yet there was none of them.

Friday, August 29, 2014

Sticky Situations

I knew I should have pushed for her surgery.  :-(  But I didn't want to risk scheduling a procedure with a runny nose.  It's during times like these when I feel like I failed at doing what's best for the kids and in this particular case, pushing for Nina's syndactyly release last summer.


right hand
At the dinner table tonight, Nina asked me why her fingers were "sticky."  What she meant was why her fingers were stuck together and not separated like ours.  Because I had mentally prepared myself for discussions like these, I thought I would be ready when the time came.  I was wrong.  
left hand





Following my "script", I gently explained that it was the way God had created her and that each of us were different in our own ways.   Although I was pleased with my answer, I completely forgot to consider the fact that my daughter is, was and perhaps, will never be satisfied with a single question.

She then asked if her fingers would become like ours once she grows up.  (At times like these, you know at the back of your mind that you are treading dangerous waters -- but I had to answer her so I carefully chose my words.)  I told her that when she no longer had colds, her doctor would work on releasing fingers.  Her big brother, being the curious child that he is, then asked how they would do it.  I didn't want to say that the doctor would use a knife (because they might decide to do the deed themselves) so I told them he would use a scalpel emphasizing that it was a tool that only doctors could use.

Nathan suddenly had that worried look in his face and asked if his sister would die to which I assured him that she wouldn't and that she had already undergone surgery before on her head.  I told him that a doctor also used a scalpel when they opened her head to fix her bones and that even after they did that, there was his baby sister beside us happy and healthy.

Nina remained quiet for a time and the next thing I knew she began tearing up.  I asked her what was bothering her and in between sobs, she said that she was scared of the doctor's scalpel.  Needless to say, I was devastated.  As I hugged her and reassured her that everything would be okay and that we would all be there for her, I knew then that we should have gone through with her surgery sooner and that we should expect a very distraught child when we do schedule it.

I know that it's too late to do anything now except to prep her so that when the time comes, she will be ready.  But geez, I have no idea how to do it :-(  Wish us luck please?  And while you're at it, do say a prayer that we get this thing (the syndactyly release -- and the tube for the ears)  finally over and done with.


P.S. - I knew something happened in school which prompted her to ask about her hands and so I asked her about it.  And true enough, one of her classmates asked why her hands were "sticky".  Note to self - talk to Teacher Joanna about this so that she can perhaps incorporate something into their lessons about the differences in each person